Institute for Quantum Science and Technology (IQST)

About IQST

The Institute for Quantum Science and Technology is a multidisciplinary group of researchers from the areas of computer science, mathematics, chemistry and physics. The goals of Calgary's Institute for Quantum Science and Technology are to conduct leading research in key theoretical and experimental topics of quantum science and technology, to provide excellent education and training in quantum science and technology and cognate areas, and to foster linkage between the Institute and other quantum science and technology institutes and with industrial partners.

Our mission is to advance quantum science and technology through interdisciplinary research, teaching, and outreach. We strive to be a world leader in research and education in pure and applied quantum science and technology.

Quantum energy research

Quantum optics

From spectroscopy to manipulating quantum information encoded in atoms, our researchers are probing light-matter interactions, including exotic antimatter.

Molecular modeling research

Molecular modeling

Taking advantage of ever increasing computing power, we are developing methods to calculate the properties of complex molecules, from water to proteins.

Nanotechnology Research

Nanotechnology

The promise of new functional materials and devices based on nanostructures spurs our researchers to work at the limits of what can be seen.

Quantum information and computing research

Quantum information and computing

Quantum information and computing holds the promise of revolutionizing how we handle, transmit, and store quantum information.

In the news


University of Calgary physicists develop novel approach to building a 'quantum internet'

Paul Barclay’s research group in the Faculty of Science makes diamond device that couples quantum information with light ...

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UCalgary’s Quantum Leap

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Federal funding allows UCalgary researcher to investigate the base components of quantum computing

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Researcher goes small to make big discoveries in computing

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